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#AuthorToolBoxBlogHop

Three marketing tips for writers

It’s that time of month again—AuthorToolBoxBlogHop, where like-minded writers exchange tips on writing, marketing, editing, querying, etc. For July, I’ve selected three marketing tips for writers that I don’t think are well known. It’s always a pleasure sharing marketing secrets.

1. The right way to share your book’s Amazon link

Okay, you’ve finally published a book. Hooray you! And naturally, you’re social media-ing the heck out of it. Whether on your blog, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, or any other platform, you’re getting the word out. “Buy my book. Here’s the link ______”.

But did you know there’s a little known secret to copying an Amazon’s link?

Here’s the unedited link to my last novel, Snow White and the Eighth Dwarf:

Snow White and the Eighth Dwarf, an adult fairy tale recreation

Snow White and the Eighth Dwarf

https://www.amazon.com/Snow-White-Eighth-Dwarf-Enchanted-ebook/dp/B06XPH21PW/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1500258454&sr=8-9&keywords=cheryl+sterling

(whew!)

See that bolded ASIN (Amazon book ID Number)? All that gibberish behind it is an Amazon electronic time stamp. It tells Amazon the exact time of your  purchase.

Here’s the thing. Every time you sell a book with that time stamp, Amazon will see an abnormal amount of sales FOR THE SAME EXACT TIME. It might send up a red flag. Your sales might not be counted.

Here’s an easy workaround

Remove everything after the ASIN. Whether you shorten the link with tinyURL or not, only use the link between www.amazon to the ASID.

2. Sticking a post to Twitter and Facebook

Going back to your new book scenario (Yeah, you!). You write a post about it on Twitter and your Facebook Page—then what? How do you keep it at the top of all your posts so it’s the first thing visitors see?

Write your post/tweet as usual and publish. Find it on your feed and look for a V symbol in the upper right hand corner of the post. Click on it and bring down the pull down menu.

Tip #2 of three marketing tips for writers. Permanently pin a post to the top of your Facebook page.

Permanently pin a post to the top of your Facebook page.

On Twitter, click on “Pin to your profile page.”

On Facebook, click on “Pin to top of page.” This only works on Facebook Pages. You do have a Facebook page, right?

Add a C.T.A. to all your correspondence

What is C.T.A.? It stands for Call To Action. Yes, you, introverted author, are going to ask your readers to buy your books.

In the front and back material of your published book (Yeah, you!) add all your contact info: email, blog link, Facebook page, Twitter page, all social media, and a link to your Amazon Author Page. You do have an Amazon Author page, right? In addition, add Amazon links to other books, and an excerpt of one of your books.

Tip 3 of three marketing tips for writers: Include a call to action CTA on all your correspondence.

It’s okay to ask your current readers to buy something else of yours. Or contact you. Or follow you on social media. Perhaps write a review. Where better than at the back of your book?

Nudge your readers with a C.T.A. This article explains how effective a C.T.A. can be.

 

Today’s #AuthorToolBoxBlogHop was brought to you by the letters “A” (Amazon link), “P” (Pin your post), and “C”, “T”, and “A” (Call to Action). I hope my three marketing tips for writers will bring you many, many sales (at different Amazon time stamps, of course).

To continue hopping through other great blogs in the monthly #AuthorToolboxBlogHop or to join, click here.

Bonus C.T.A.

Thanks for reading to the bottom of this post. I’m sending out my own Call To Action. I’ve finished the sequel to Snow White and the Eighth Dwarf, titled Red Riding Hood and the Lone Wolfe.

I’m looking for beta readers. If you’re interested, please contact me at cherylsterling@hotmail.com

See, CTAs are painless.

Blessings,

Cheryl

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Do you have a self-published book marketing plan?

Do you have a book marketing plan for your self-published book?

Do you have a self-published book marketing plan?Is your book self-published?  Have you figured out your self-published book marketing plan?

With the introduction of the Kindle in 2007 (only 10 years ago?) the publishing industry changed. It’s still changing.  I believe the big city publishers continue to work their way through how they can survive. This means they’re skittish on taking chances on unknown writers – that’s you.  Self-publishing may be the only way to get your work to the readers.

Assuming you’ve published to Amazon, Barnes & Noble, iTunes, etc, how do you market your book? This new venue has resulted in thousands of more books becoming available to readers.  How do you stand out in the crowd?

Here are some tips on how to market your self-published book.

  1. Make sure it’s well written. Polish, polish, polish and have it edited by someone who not only can find grammatical and punctuation errors, but can spot plot holes, characterization problems and continuity lapses. If you’re going to forgo the NYC publishing process, make your work look like it hasn’t.
  2. Find your reader. Yeah, easier said than done, but you know the type of audience who will read your book because that person is you. Where do you hang out? Where do you go to find new reads? Target those areas and you’ll find your readers. I know I’ve overlooked a couple of places where I could publish my books, hitting my target audience right in their pocketbooks.
  3. Brand yourself. I’ve made a concentrated effort to increase my brand awareness. I write paranormal romantic comedies, and try to capitalize on the “Extraordinary romances set in an alternate realities” that I have at the top of this blog.
  4. Use free internet marketing. This means Facebook and other social media. Don’t participate in every avenue there is, or you’ll stretch your time (better spent writing) too thin. Pick two or three venues you enjoy. Comment on others’ posts. Be a presence. Be an authority on your niche. I have a Pinterest board dedicated to book marketing, check it out.

Making a plan and having goals are useless if they are not implemented. Break the goals down into manageable steps, create a calendar and find someone who can hold you accountable. Use the points listed above to reorient your self-published book marketing plan. You’ll see a steady increase in sales.

All the best!

Cheryl

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