character development

How to write a villain. Creating a villain.

Character Development – Creating a Villain

Today’s post looks deep into the skill of creating a villain.

Your story contains many elements that are critical: a main character, a plot, settings, etc. One of the most important is the villain or the antagonist. He adds depth and flavor to your story, more so than any other secondary character.

Who is your villain? Your villain is your antagonist, your protagonist’s main threat to reaching her goals. He stands in her way, creates conflicts, and forces her to make tough choices that tests her and ultimately makes her stronger.Click To Tweet

Let’s dig deep into creating a villain.

Continue reading Creating a Villain #AuthorToolboxBlogHop

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinby feather
Read more

Use numerology to define fictional character traits. Learn more at www.cherylsterlingbooks.com

Create Characters Through Numerology

For today’s #ThrowbackThursday, we’re in the Wayback Machine, traveling to another of my favorite posts where we explore how to create characters through numerology.

Use numerology to define fictional character traits. Learn more at www.cherylsterlingbooks.com

Use numerology to create characters

 

In today’s AtoZChallenge, the letter “N” is for Numerology

Today, we continue exploring character development, using Numerology as our base.

Numerology traces its origins to the ancient Greece mathematician, Pythagoras, one of the founders of geometry (Yuck!). He discovered the relationship between mind and energy and the almost uncanny match of personality traits based on one’s birth date.

In recent times, author Dan Millman’s book, The Life You Were Born to Live, has renewed the study of numerology.

A quick overview of each life path number

  1. Creative, confidence, self-motivated
  2. cooperation, balance, peacemakers
  3. expressive, sensitive, optimistic
  4. stable, practical, hardworking
  5. freedom, discipline, adventurous
  6. acceptance, nurturing, compassionate
  7. trusting, intuitive, pessimistic
  8. ambitious, goal-oriented, blunt
  9. humanitarian, compassionate, generous

How can I use numerology to define my character’s personality?

First, start with their birthday. I know, fictional characters don’t usually have birthdays. Look at your era, at astrological signs, and at numerology traits to determine a date.

Let me give you an example. Annie Faraday, the main character in the book I’ll write later this year (it’s a WWII story), was born on January 20, 1920. Adding her birth date together 0+1+2+0+1+9+2+0, we arrive at 15. Taking this one step further, add 1+5 to arrive at Annie’s life path number of 6. We express this as 15/6, as the “1” and “5” are minor influencers.

Turning to Mr. Millman’s book, we see the characteristics of a “6” personality are:

  • Nurturing
  • Symathetic
  • Compassionate
  • Loyal
  • Protective

“6’s” are often called caretakers.

Each characteristic has a negative side to it. “6’s” can become anxious, suspicious, jealous or unstable.

The “1” minor influence in Annie’s numbers gives her focus, strong-will, courage, and possibly makes her stubborn and selfish.

The “5” minor influence can make her adventurous, flexible, social, or unstable and careless.

As you can see, Annie can be a complex character, but isn’t that what you want for the characters you write?

And remember, not all “6” are alike, as not all Geminis are alike. There is no monopoly on a trait.

Writing characters is a complex task

Many factors should be taken into consideration when creating a character. Take me, for example.

  • Astrology (I’m a Leo, bossy and confident).
  • I’m also the first born (responsible, driven, confident).
  • I’m a 31/4 (imaginative and optimistic from the “3”, independent and stongwilled from the “1”, and the “4” life path number is characteristic of a step-by-step approach. “4’s” are often called the builder.)
  • On the Myers-Briggs test, I come out as either an INTJ (imaginative and strategic thinkers) or an ENTJ, (bold, imaginative and strong-willed leaders). My classification depends on how introverted (I) or extroverted (E) I’m feeling when I take the test.

Numerology can create friction between your characters

People with a life path number of 4 are hard working,

People with the lifepath number of 2 are practical and sensitive. They are often called The Balancer.I’m a “4”. The builder. Step-by-step. Start at A and end at Z.

My husband is a “2”. The balancer. Considers all contingencies before making a decision.

I want to start. He wants to know if the possibility of rain will influence the decision. Or a full moon. Or if it’s a Tuesday.

Life has been easier once I discovered his vacillation is the perfect character trait of a “2”. He can’t help himself.

I found this chart online that will tell you the compatibility of people with two different life numbers. I’ll be using it in the future.

Numerology is one way to create your fictional characters. What method do you use?

Blessings until then,

Cheryl

If you’d like to continue reading my blog posts, please use the entry form to the right.

If you know of someone who would enjoy learning more about Numerology, use the buttons on the left to share this post.

For an in-depth reading, check with Tricia at http://www.triciasenergygarden.com

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinby feather
Read more

Myers-Briggs personality test. www.cherylsterlingbooks.com

It’s #ThrowbackThursday, and we’re in the wayback machine to April, 2017 to learn more about the Myers-Briggs Personality Test

Create fictional characters for your book using the Myers-Briggs personality test. www.cherylsterlingbooks.com

Don’t have your characters act alike

The Myers-Briggs Personality Test, officially called Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, developed by Katharine Cook Briggs and her daughter Isabel Briggs Myers, it is a theory that there are sixteen major personality types based on eight factors:

Extraversion (E) or Introversion (I)—do you focus on the inner or outer world?

Sensing (S) or Intuition(N)—how you view information

Thinking (T) or Feeling(F)—how you make decisions

Judging(J) or Perceiving(P)—how you deal with the outside world

But, Cheryl, you ask, what does Myers-Briggs have to do with writing?

A great question. For the next two days, my posts for the AtoZChallenge will be on creating characters. One method I’ve used is taking the Myers-Briggs test as one of my characters. Once I have the results, I can look at what the characters have in common, and, more fun from a creative standpoint, how they differ.

Can I put an ENTJ (Commander) with an ISFP (Adverturer)? Will my hero ESFP (Entertainer) take orders from a heroine ISTJ (Logistician). Mixing and matching character types and having a blueprint for how they will react to events and situations helps in the writing process.

Take the test at 16Personalities.com. You might shed some light on your own personality and those around you.

Blessings,

Cheryl

If you’d like to continue reading my my blog posts, please use the entry form to the right.

If you know of someone who would like to know about creating characters through the Myers-Briggs personality test, use the buttons on the left to share this post. Thank you.

Become a Sterling Reader. Receive exclusive excerpts to future books, book cover reveals, free books, and a ton of other fun information by signing up for my newsletter.

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinby feather
Read more