Keyboard Shortcuts #ThrowbackThursday

#ThrowbackThursday Keyboard Shortcuts

I love, love, love keyboard shortcuts. They are the bomb. Or maybe I’m just lazy. No. Efficient. Yeah, I’m uber efficient.
It’s amazing how many people don’t use keyboard shortcuts, even the basics like CNTL+A for chose all. How weird that you wouldn’t want to make your typing easier and faster so you can write more or have time for other things.
Here is a handy-dandy list of keyboard shortcuts. I hope you’ll take advantage of one or two and increase your word count!

keyboard shortcuts

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Book Anniversary! Dearly Departed Dating Service on Sale

Book Anniversary 99¢ Sale

August 31, 2018 celebrates the two year book anniversary of The Dearly Departed Dating Service.

To celebrate, I’m running a 99¢ sale until 11:59 Labor Day, September 3rd, 2018.

99¢book anniversary sale

You’re never too dead to fall in love.

Clare Holmes died once. No one bothered to tell her. It worked out well in the end, as the powers-that-be sent her back to Earth. No one bothered to tell her that, either. It might have come in handy when she started seeing dead people, handier yet when they demanded she set up a dating service for them.

Now she has ghosts clambering at her door looking for their soul mates, a million dollar inheritance, and a couple of wacky sisters who are after her pot of gold.

She can handle them.

It’s the handsome lawyer who’s administrating her bequest who keeps her up at night.

To buy the ebook on Amazon, go here.

To buy at Barnes and Noble, Kobo, an ibooks, go here.

Purchase at the Google Play Store, go here.

The Dearly Departed Dating Service is now available in paperback. Go here to purchase.

Enjoy your weekend.

Blessings,

Cheryl

p.s. If you’ve read The Dearly Departed Dating Service, please leave a review where you purchased it. Reviews make our books more visible and are greatly appreciated. Thanks!

3D composite book covers courtesy of software found at http://diybookcovers.com/3Dmockups/#

(So easy! I did it in less than a minute!)

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Using Subplots #ThrowbackThursday

Throwback Thursday

It’s #ThrowbackThursday, and we’re traveling in the wayback machine to just about this time last year to discuss how using subplots can deepen your story.

Using subplots to deepen your story

NOT ALL STORIES REQUIRE the addition of one or more subplots. Adding more to a rich, layered, and textured main plot could detract your reader.

NOT ALL STORIES REQUIRE the addition of one or more subplots. Using subplots can enhance your story. On the other hand, subplots can:

  • Deepen characterization by revealing flaws, strengths and growth.
  • Deepen theme.
  • Add complexity and momentum by diverting the reader’s attention from the main story, forcing tension until they can return to the main plot.
  • Introduce back-story, which in turn layers inner conflict, motive and invokes sympathy with the reader.
  • Introduce new characters.
  • Develop relationships.
  • Break up long scenes.
  • Control story tension.
  • Deepen conflict, making it more credible and complex.
  • Subplots can involve the main or secondary characters or both.

Like the main plot, subplots must follow the same rules. They should have a beginning, middle and end. At the end of the story, tie them up in the reverse order in which they were introduced. If “A” is the main plot, “B” is secondary and “C” is tertiary, they should be introduced as A, B, C, and closed out as C, B, A.

The subplot should not overshadow the main plot. Whatever happens in the subplot, never lose sight of the main line of action.

The number of subplot scenes should not outnumber main plot scenes.

Do not introduce so many subplots the reader is distracted from the main story. One to three is the rule of thumb. It’s hard to make characters and their problems distinct after that.

Subplots come in two varieties:

  1. Parallel. The characters know each other through a common link—the workplace, a vacation resort, a wedding, but their stories are independent of each other. This can be difficult to pull off, but the characters can learn from each other and influence each other’s storylines.
  2. Interwoven. This is the most common type of subplot. Tie the subplot to the main plot and any other subplots and increase the complexity of the story. The subplots should affect the main plot. If the subplot can be omitted from the story without affecting the main plot, does it belong?

Subplots should cover three areas:

  1. There should be connections between the sub and main plots. Interweave the relationships. The outcome of one affects something else.
  2. They should add complications to the main plot. If the hero is fighting for a promotion, reveal his alcoholic background, have his sponsor fall off the wagon, or he should.
  3. It should contrast the main plot. Don’t repeat what’s established, but explore different tones, purposes and ranges. Portray a variety of experiences to add depth and complexity to the overall story.

Adroit handling of subplots will enrich your story.

If you’d like to continue to receive my blog posts, please use the entry form to the right. Also sign up for my newsletter, and become a Sterling Reader. Enjoy sneak peaks, free books, advance notice of bargain prices, and much more.

Blessings,

Cheryl

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