Writing tips

Hook Your Readers with These Tips

Hook Your Readers with These Tips

Start Your Book the Right Way-How to Hook Your Readers

Even if you’re new to writing, you know the importance of writing a hook for your novel. It grabs your reader’s attention and convinces him to buy. A good hook raises questions, piques curiosity, and draws the reader deeper into your story.
Without a compelling, question—producing opening, your reader isn’t going to buy. You only have a few sentences to make an impression. Nowadays, no one has the luxury of time. You have to hit them fast and hard.
Your reader wants to be drawn into a believable world from word one. He expects to be entertained. Don’t disappoint him. Continue reading Start Your Book The Right Way

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The Internal Editor

The Internal EditorI met with someone the other day who brought up an interesting point.  What do you do when you can’t turn off the internal editor?  When she/he is ruining all attempts to get words written?

Here’s what I do:

  • Black out your computer screen.  If you can’t see the words, you’ll be less tempted to go back and correct them.
  •  Use XXXX.  Whenever I’m stuck on something–the perfect word, the fact I should research on the internet, I type in XXX.  Later, I can do a search and replace the XXX’s with what I thought I needed.  In most cases, the story is fine without it.
  • Set a timer.  Set a timer for a short amount, maybe ten minutes, then give yourself permission to write as fast as you can, ignoring punctuation, word choices, etc.  As a reward, you promise your internal editor free reign after the slotted time period.
  • Give yourself permission to write dreck.  Even if you think you’re writing dreck, it’s good dreck.  Not every building can be the Taj Mahal.  Sometimes you have to start with a straw hut and make a lot of improvements.
  • Throw your internal editor in a closet and lose the key.
  • Participate in a Book in a Week challenge or National  Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) in November.  My writing group typically holds a Write a Book in a Month contest between the February meeting and March meeting.  Participating in such a challenge automatically gags the internal editor.  There’s no time to stop because the focus of the task is word count, word count and nothing but word count.

Try one of these tips the next time your internal editor starts screaming at you.  You’ll get more written than you think.

Blessings!

Cheryl

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We're told as writers to use all five senses. Here's a list I found that describes colors other than the basic red, blue and yellow.

We're told as writers to use all five senses. Here's a list I found that describes colors other than the basic red, blue and yellow.We’re told as writers to use all five senses. Here’s a list I found that describes colors other than the basic red, blue and yellow.  Use this list to enrich your writing.

Colors:

Black:

Onyx, Ebony, Lampblack, Midnight, Blue-black, Carbon, Coal, Raven, Jet, Shadow, Ink, Black Pear, Anthracite, Sable, Obsidian, Pitch, Pepper, Soot, Opaque, Licorice.

Purple:

Amethyst, Lilac, Magenta, Violet, Blackberry, Mauve, Indigo, Orchid, Heliotrope, Dewberry, Plum, Grape, Lavender, Egg Plant, Heather.

Green:

Jade, Grass, Forest Bluish-green, Emerald, Aqua, Moss, Seafoam, Pine, Mallard, Sea, Malachite, Mist, Verdant, Pea, Hunter, Leaf, Pistachio, Kiwi, Spearmint, Aquamarine, Lime, Olive, Caledonia, Chartreuse, Kelly, Sage, Apple, Spruce, Mint, Celery, Periodot, Dill Parsley, Holly, Fern, Baltic, Frog Kelp, Avocado, Lettuce, Eucalyptus, Fatigue, Bayberry, Loden, Gooseberry, Bottle, Fir, Basil, Willow.

Blue:

Azure, Electric, Wedgewood, Neon, Turquoise, Periwinkle, Cornflower, Powder, Sky, Peacock, Slate, Zinc, Rosemary, French, Air Force, Ultra Marine, Indigo, Sapphire, Steel, Ice, Lapis Lazuli, Marine, Delft, Arctic, Mallard, Bluebird, Carpi, Union, Wisteria, China, Teal, Royal, Cobalt, Robin’s Egg, Baby, Navy, Glacier, Federal, Moroccan, Denim, Ensign, Blueberry, Chambray, Bluebell, Mediterranean.

White/Off-White:

Milk, Quartz, Cream, Ecru, Magnolia, Opal, Linen, Winter, Angora, Frosty, Almond, Cauliflower, Birch, Swan, Cotton Seed, Pearly, Eggshell, Ivory, Alabaster, Oyster, Parchment, Stone, Moonstone, Champaign, Cameo, Sugar, String, Diamond, Snowdrops, Natural, Rice, Vanilla, Jade, Oatmeal, Lily, Salt, Chalk, Snow, Bone, Antique, Muslin, Cement, Gardenia, Taffy, Plaster.

Gray/Silver:

Smoke, Silvery, Tattletale, Charcoal, Pewter, Sooty, Salt and Pepper, Dun, Pearl, Slate, Cloud, Cannon, Armor, Chinchilla, Aluminum, Mortar, Tin, Gunmetal, Hoary, Steel, Funeral, Battle ship, Diesel, Nickel, Lead, Quicksilver, Ashen, Dove, Concrete, Iron, Graphite, Artichoke, Platinum, Tinsel, Mercury, Primer.

Yellow/Gold:

Fool’s Gold, Burnished, Flaxen, Butter, Blond, Brass, Sandy, Mustard, Topaz, Buttercup, Forsythia, Honeydew, Coreopsis, Cat’s Eye, Cheese, Tawny, Palomino, Jonquil, Platinum, Honey, White-gold, Wheat, Chamois, Pear, Butterscotch, Corn, Citrine, Maize, Goldenrod, Buff, Ash Blond, Straw, Cadmium, Daffodil, Primrose, Curry, Banana, Pineapple, Sunflower, Canary, Cornsilk, Marigold, Beeswax.

Red/Pink:

Ruby, Dusky Rose, Claret, Maroon, Ox-blood, Brick, Tyrian Cochineal, Blood, Lobster, Scarlet, Salmon, Candy Apple, Garnet, Crimson, Shrimp, Apple, Brass, Rubicund, Auburn, Cherry, Ashes of Roses, Vermilion, Strawberry, Currant, Coral, Rose, Wine, Burgundy, Tomato, Beet, Fire Engine, Red Amber, Rubellite, Youngberry, Mango, Magenta, Tabasco, Hot Pink, Fuchsia, Watermelon, Holy Berry, Barberry, Boysenberry, Geranium, Cardinal, Vermeil, Loganberry, Cayenne Pepper, Corn Poppy, Coralberry, Wineberry, Pepto-Bismol Pink, Bismuth, Cerise Carmine, Cinnabar, Bordeaux, Cranberry, Brandy, Canyon, Elderberry Shell Pink, Heather, Poinsettia, Coralbells, Tearose, Paprika.

Brown:

Earth, Cocoa, Copper, Cinnamon, Tortoise Shell, Mahogany, Taupe, Tan, Henna, Fawn, Ginger, Rust, Khaki, Mushroom, Saddle, Brunette, Buckskin, Foxy, Chocolate, Bay, Sand, Toffee, Roan, Butternut, Coffee, Tawney, Rosewwod, Café au lait, Hazel, Ecru, Umber, Bronze, Nutmeg, Raisin, Maple, Tanned, Mocha, Walnut, Chili, Espresso, Cashmere, Clay, Potato, Tobacco, Bark, Amaretto, Suntan, Cordovan, Twine, Bamboo, Hazelnut, Driftwood, Peanut, Chestnut, Pecan, Camel, Spice, Mohair, Wicker, Timber, Pebble, Foxtail, Putty, Jute, Oak, Cashew, Butterrum, Mousy, Hickory, Drab, Acorn, Caramel, Cedar, Champagne, Suede, Butterscotch, Tea, Sandstone, Fudge, Redwood, Cognac, Burlap, Cappuccino, Desert, Latten, Soy.

Orange:

Pumpkin, Burnt Orange, Terra-cotta, Raspberry, Russet, Melon, Berry, Carrot, Tangerine, Nasturtium, Peach, Trumpet Vine, Canyon, Coral, Apricot, Rust, Bittersweet, Cantaloupe, Titan, Persimmon, Marigold.

Compiled by Lisa Snider
Crayola Color Corner
Crayola® Crayon Chronology

Since 1903, when Binney & Smith introduced the first Crayola crayon, people have been fascinated with the heritage of our color names. You’ll find a summary of Crayola crayon history for now but come back soon and explore a detailed description of how each individual crayon was introduced, how the name was chosen, read interesting stories about each crayon, and more!

photo courtesy of:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/rednut/

 

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